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The Law Review annually welcomes scholars, legal professionals and community leaders from across the country to discuss legal issues related to important current events.

Watch this page for information on the upcoming symposium, including contact and registration information, presenters, panels and agenda. For past topics, see the Past Symposia page.

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108th Detroit Mercy Law Review Symposium
Law School 101: An Exploration of Legal Pedagogy
Friday, March 8, 2024, 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

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Schedule of Events

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    9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.: Welcome Remarks & Panel 1: Teaching Methods (Room 226)

    Panel 1: Now You're Thinking Like a Lawyer? - Innovations in Teaching Methodology for Student Success

    • Christos D. Strubakos J.D., Ph.D.  - Research Attorney, Michigan Court of Appeals
      • What can Computational Neuroscience Teach Us About Cognition, Legal Reasoning, and Legal Pedagogy?
    • Louis N. Schulze, Jr. – Associate Dean and Professor of Academic Support, Florida International University College of Law
      • Teaching and Learning Methods that Comport with Educational Psychology
    • Dr. Chance Meyer – Visiting Professor of Practice, New England Law & Adjunct Professor of Law, Nova Southeastern University College of Law (Joint presenter with Prof. Noël)
      • The Gray Box of Legal Analysis: Disentangling Knowledge and Skill
    • Nicole Noël – Director of Academic Excellence & Assistant Professor of Law, New England Law (Joint presenter with Dr. Meyer)
      • The Gray Box of Legal Analysis: Disentangling Knowledge and Skill
    • Jamie R. Abrams – Professor of Law, American University College of Law
      • Inclusive Socratic Teaching: Why Law Schools Need It and How to Achieve It
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    11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Panel 2: Curriculum (Room 252)

    Panel 2: Reimagining the Curriculum – How the Legal Education of the Future Should Look

    • Joshua C. Teitelbaum – Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center
      • Does the 1L Curriculum Make a Difference?
    • Elizabeth Sherowski – Assistant Professor of Law, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law
      • Gen Z Meets Next Gen: Using Generation Z Pedagogy to Prepare Students for the NextGen Bar Exam
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    11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Panel 3: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (Room 352)

    Panel 3: Breaking Down Barriers – More Than a Theoretical Commitment to D.E.I.

    • Dr. Courtney A. Griffin – Assistant Dean, Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law
      • Stories of those Untold: Identifying and Overcoming Obstacles of Black Women Pursuing Legal Education
    • Aníbal Rosario-Lebrón – Assistant Clinical Professor, Rutgers Law School
      • If These Blackboards Could Talk 2: The Fem‐Crit Classroom
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    12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.: Lunch (Detroit Mercy Law Atrium)

    Please join us for lunch in the Detroit Mercy Law Atrium.
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    1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.: Panel 4: Professional Identity & Mental Health (Room 226)

    Panel 4: Mindful Lawyers – Developing Professional Identity and Mental Well-Being in Law School

    • Katya Cronin – Associate Professor, George Washington University Law School
      • Put on Your Own Oxygen Mask First: The Importance of Value-Centered Lawyering in Promoting Well-Being, Quality Client Representation, and a Thriving Legal Field
    • Joshua Aaron Jones – Legal Writing Professor, California Western School of Law
      • Implementing ABA Standard 303(B) with Positive Legal Education in a Community of Inquiry
    • Ieisha Humphrey – Assistant Dean, Student Affairs, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law
      • Well, Well, Well: Achieving Harmony Between Legal Pedagogy and Well-Being
    • Gil Seinfeld – Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School
      • Changes and Challenges for Faculty in Addressing Law Student Mental Health Needs
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    3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.: Keynote Presentation: Radical Reinvention of the First Year of Law School (Detroit Mercy Law Atrium)

    Keynote: Radical Reinvention of the First Year of Law School – What Subjects and Ideas Are Foundational?

    • Mary Lu Bilek – Former Dean and Professor of Law, UMass Law School and CUNY Law School
    • Claudia Angelos – Clinical Professor of Law, New York University School of Law
    • Joan W. Howarth – Distinguished Visiting Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Law & Dean Emerita, Michigan State University College of Law
    • Deborah Jones Merritt Distinguished University Professor, Moritz College of Law at The Ohio State University
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    4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.: Reception (Detroit Mercy Law Atrium)

    Please join us for a reception in the Detroit Mercy Law Atrium.

Speaker Bios

Panel 1: Now You're Thinking Like a Lawyer? - Innovations in Teaching Methodology for Student Success

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    Christos D. Strubakos J.D., Ph.D.

    What can Computational Neuroscience Teach Us About Cognition, Legal Reasoning, and Legal Pedagogy?

    Christos Strubakos holds a PhD in Medicine from Wayne State University's School of Medicine, specializing in neurophysiology and neuroimaging. After completing his graduate training, he received postdoctoral training in human clinical neurology at Henry Ford Hospital's Department of Neurology. He received his Juris Doctor, magna cum laude in May 2023, from the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, and was admitted to the Michigan Bar in November 2023. Christos works as a Research Attorney at the Michigan Court of Appeals. Christos's scholarly interests lie in the intersection of law and neuroscience. He has taught cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology as an Adjunct Professor at the University of Windsor and published a number of articles in medical journals and law reviews.

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    Louis N. Schulze, Jr.

    Teaching and Learning Methods that Comport with Educational Psychology

    Louis Schulze focuses his teaching on supporting student success both during law school and in bar preparation. His scholarship promotes the use of the science of learning by both legal educators and students.

    Professor Schulze has served as the Chair of the AALS Section on Academic Support, as a founding member of the Executive Board of the Association of Academic Support Educators, and as co-founder and President of the New England Consortium on Academic Support. He has drawn insights on pedagogy from teaching Evidence, Torts, Criminal Law, and Legal Writing.

    He also would like to note that he was deeply honored to teach as a visiting professor at the University of Detroit Mercy Law last spring.

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    Dr. Chance Meyer

    The Gray Box of Legal Analysis: Disentangling Knowledge and Skill

    Dr. Chance Meyer is a learning expert and professor in New England Law’s Academic Excellence Program. Before joining New England Law and earning a doctorate in education from the Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt, Dr. Meyer served as Assistant Dean of Academic Success and Professionalism at Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law.

    Prior to becoming an educator, Dr. Meyer was a capital defense attorney representing death-sentenced inmates in trial and appellate courts, in state and federal jurisdictions. He served as a law clerk to U.S. District Court Judge Robert T. Dawson. His research ranges from evidence-based practice and justice pedagogies in legal education to Eighth Amendment issues surrounding the death penalty.

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    Nicole Noël

    The Gray Box of Legal Analysis: Disentangling Knowledge and Skill

    Professor Noël is the Director of the Academic Excellence Program at New England Law Boston. Having been a first-generation college and law student, she is dedicated to ensuring that Academic Excellence programming has measurable impact on student outcomes. As an educator, she focuses on guiding students to become self-directed, life-long learners using evidence-based learning strategies. Before joining the New England Law faculty, she served as a Professor of Practice in the Academic Success and Professionalism Program at Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law.

    Prior to teaching, Professor Noël was a capital defense attorney representing Florida death row inmates in state and federal courts. She began her legal career as a public defender in Miami.

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    Jamie R. Abrams

    Inclusive Socratic Teaching: Why Law Schools Need It and How to Achieve It

    Jamie Abrams is a Professor of Law at the American University Washington College of Law where she teaches torts, legal writing, and family law. She also directs the first-year Legal Research & Writing program.

    She has a book forthcoming in 2024 with the University of California Press titled Inclusive Socratic Teaching: Why Law Schools Need It and How to Achieve It (forthcoming 2024). She has also published numerous articles about law teaching, including Legal Education’s Curricular Tipping Point, 49 Hofstra L. Rev. 897 (2021); Feminist Pedagogy in Law Schools, in The Oxford Handbook of Feminism and Law in the United States (Oxford University Press, Eds. Martha Chamallas, Verna Williams, and Deborah Brakke 2022); The Deconstructed Issue-Spotting Exam, 68 J. Legal Educ. 194 (Winter 2019); Experiential Learning in the Era of Donald Trump, 55 Duquesne L. Rev. 75 (2017), and Reframing the Socratic Method, 64 J. Legal Educ. 562 (2015).

    She was recently awarded the Blackboard Catalyst Award for Teaching & Learning for the large-scale dental malpractice deposition simulation that she developed and launched. This simulation is featured in Tort Law Simulations: Bridge to Practice Series (2020). While at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law, she was recognized with the Presidential Exemplary Multicultural Law Teaching Award, Teacher of the Year, and as a nominee for the LGBT Faculty Ally award. At American University’s Washington College of Law, she received an Innovations in Law Teaching Award.

Panel 2: Reimagining the Curriculum – How the Legal Education of the Future Should Look

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    Joshua C. Teitelbaum

    Does the 1L Curriculum Make a Difference?

    Joshua C. Teitelbaum is the David Belding Professor of Law and a Professor of Economics (by courtesy) at Georgetown University. His scholarly areas include law and economics and empirical legal studies. His work has appeared in the American Economic Review, Econometrica, the Journal of Legal Studies, and the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, among other journals. He is co-editor of the Research Handbook in Behavioral Law and Economics, an Editor of the International Review of Law and Economics, and a Fellow at the Georgetown Center for Economic Research. He previously served as Associate Dean for Research and Academic Programs at Georgetown University the Law Center and as an Associate Editor of the Supreme Court Economic Review.

    Before coming to Georgetown in 2009, Professor Teitelbaum clerked for Judge Richard M. Berman of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, practiced corporate and securities law at Cahill Gordon & Reindel in New York, and was a Visiting Assistant Professor at Cornell Law School. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Cornell University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

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    Elizabeth Sherowski

    Gen Z Meets Next Gen: Using Generation Z Pedagogy to Prepare Students for the NextGen Bar Exam

    Elizabeth Sherowski is a nationally recognized expert in learner-focused pedagogy, and has written and presented extensively on making legal education more transparent, accessible, and accountable to students. Professor Sherowski previously worked was an Assistant Prosecuting Attorney for Franklin County, Ohio who tried juvenile, felony, and appellate cases. She later opened her own law practice, which focused on juvenile, disability, and education law.

    Professor Sherowski joined the Detroit Mercy Law faculty in 2020 as a Visiting Assistant Professor. In 2022, she was promoted to Assistant Professor of Law. She previously taught at The Ohio State University College of Law, the University of North Carolina School of Law, and Mercer University School of Law.

Panel 3: Breaking Down Barriers – More Than a Theoretical Commitment to D.E.I.

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    Dr. Courtney A. Griffin

    Stories of those Untold: Identifying and Overcoming Obstacles of Black Women Pursuing Legal Education

    Dr. Courtney A. Griffin is a proud Detroit, MI native turned Michigan State University Alumna and DePaul University Alumna, possessing a Bachelor of Arts in Professional Writing, a Bachelor of Arts in Media Arts and Technology and Master of Arts in Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse. Courtney also holds a Master of Education Instructional Technology and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership with a focus on Higher Education. 

    With over 10 years of experience in higher education, she is passionate about increasing the number of Students of Color at institutions of higher education, ensuring that they feel a sense of belonging once enrolled. 

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    Aníbal Rosario-Lebrón

    If These Blackboards Could Talk 2: The Fem‐Crit Classroom

    Professor Rosario Lebrón is a Puerto Rican professor, attorney, linguist, and photographer. He holds an LL.M. in Legal Theory from New York University and a J.D., a Post-Graduate Certificate in Linguistics, and a B.S. from the University of Puerto Rico. Before joining Rutgers, he taught at Howard University, University of Louisville, and Hofstra University. Professor Rosario Lebrón also has taught at Universidad de Puerto Rico and Universidad Interamericana. He is a former member of the Board of Directors of LatCrit. His research examines the interconnection between Evidence, Family, Criminal and Constitutional Law from a cross-disciplinary lens. Specifically, he studies how to reform the law to empower groups such as women, people of color, LGTBQ+ people, and minors in their pursuit of equality. Professor Rosario Lebrón is also committed to bridging the educational achievement gap and has worked in numerous pipeline initiatives.

Panel 4: Mindful Lawyers – Developing Professional Identity and Mental Well-Being in Law School

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    Katya Cronin

    Put on Your Own Oxygen Mask First: The Importance of Value-Centered Lawyering in Promoting Well-Being, Quality Client Representation, and a Thriving Legal Field

    Professor Katya Cronin is an Associate Professor in the Fundamentals of Lawyering Program at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, DC. Her research focuses on legal pedagogy and the cognitive science of learning, professional identity formation, and well-being through the lens of positive psychology. Prof. Cronin frequently presents on these topics at legal writing and well-being conferences and events, and her most recent publications appear in the Journal of the Legal Writing Institute and the Second Draft.

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    Joshua Aaron Jones

    Implementing ABA Standard 303(B) with Positive Legal Education in a Community of Inquiry

    Professor Jones earned a Bachelor of Music Education cum laude at the University of Montevallo. At the University of New Hampshire School of Law, he earned a Juris Doctorate and Master of Education Law. He served as a teaching and research assistant for Professor Sarah Redfield, who was then the Education Law Institute's director.

    After six years of practice in Pensacola, Florida, Professor Jones was awarded the Downy Brand Fellowship for Public Service and Leadership at McGeorge School of Law. While there, he earned an LL.M. in Government and Public Policy with an emphasis on school law. He also led the Education Pipeline Initiative.

    He presently serves as a professor at California Western School of Law, teaching legal writing, research, and education law. Professor Jones is chair of the AALS Section on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Issues and co-chair of the Legal Writing, Rhetoric, and Research Section's outreach committee.

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    Ieisha Humphrey

    Well, Well, Well: Achieving Harmony Between Legal Pedagogy and Well-Being

    In her role as Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Ieisha Humphrey advises and counsels students, supports the Student Bar Association, and student organization events. You’ll see her promote programming on ethics, wellness, and service-learning.

    Deeply committed to law student success, Dean Humphrey has been an adjunct professor of immigration law and bar exam skills. She also is a grader and tutor for bar exam preparation programs for the last 18 bar exams. Dean Humphrey is passionate about legal access and social justice, so since 2013, she has served as a pro bono attorney for the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center.

    Recently appointed to the Michigan Commission on Well-Being in the Law, Dean Humphrey will work on increasing access and resources to support law student wellness along with eliminating the stigma associated with help-seeking behaviors.

    Dean Humphrey is a proud Chicago sports fan and believes that the most powerful and priceless card in her wallet is her library card. For self-care, you’ll find Dean Humphrey attending concerts, reading a book, and traveling.

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    Gil Seinfeld

    Changes and Challenges for Faculty in Addressing Law Student Mental Health Needs

    Gil Seinfeld is the Robert A. Sullivan Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School, where he teaches and writes about federal jurisdiction, the constitutional law of federalism, and civil procedure. From 2016 to 2021, Seinfeld served as Michigan Law School's Associate Dean for Academic Programming, and he is currently working on a book about legal education that draws on his experience as Associate Dean.

    Prior to joining the Michigan Law faculty, Seinfeld practiced briefly in New York City at the law firm of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale & Dorr, where he focused on appellate litigation. Seinfeld has been a Fellow in the Program in Law and Public Affairs at Princeton University and is a two-time winner of Michigan Law School's L. Hart Wright Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Keynote: Radical Reinvention of the First Year of Law School – What Subjects and Ideas Are Foundational?

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    Mary Lu Bilek

    Radical Reinvention of the First Year of Law School: What Subjects and Ideas Are Foundational?

    Mary Lu Bilek’s work in legal education spans 36 years spent building, growing, learning and leading in two public law schools focused on creating access to and diversity in the profession and building programs designed to develop social justice lawyers prepared to serve communities marginalized by and underserved by the law and the profession.

    Bilek joined the faculty at CUNY School of Law in 1985 where she helped to move it to accreditation, to develop its innovative experientially-centered curriculum, to create a pipeline program, to build academic and bar support programs, and to develop programs to address the justice gap. She served as dean of CUNY School of Law from 2016 to March 2021, privileged to lead while the school was named “the premier public interest law school in the country” and topped the list of “the most diverse law schools in the country.”

    Bilek served as dean of the University of Massachusetts School of Law from 2012-2016, charged to lead the Commonwealth’s first public law school to accreditation. Under her leadership, UMass Law founded Justice Bridge, an incubator designed to support solo practitioners who served modest-means clients.

    Bilek has been a member of the Council of the ABA Section on Legal Education since 2019. She co-chairs the New York City Bar Association’s Council on the Profession. She has served on the Massachusetts Access to Justice Commission and the Boards of the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation, the National Center for Economic Justice, and CALI.

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    Claudia Angelos

    Radical Reinvention of the First Year of Law School: What Subjects and Ideas Are Foundational?

    Claudia Angelos is Clinical Professor of Law at New York University School of Law, where she has taught clinical courses that engage students in representing clients and addressing issues in the criminal legal system. Over more than thirty years at the Law School she and her students litigated more than one hundred criminal justice-related civil rights cases in the New York federal courts. She speaks frequently on a range of issues, including legal education, the rights of incarcerated people, critical race theory, civil rights, ethics, and pretrial and trial practice and writes on those subjects. She is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. She has been a long-time president and general counsel of the New York Civil Liberties Union and has served on the board and the executive committee of the American Civil Liberties Union. She has also served as a member of the board and executive committees of the Society of American Law Teachers, the Clinical Legal Education Association, and Prisoners’ Legal Services of New York.

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    Joan W. Howarth

    Radical Reinvention of the First Year of Law School: What Subjects and Ideas Are Foundational?

    Joan W. Howarth is the Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Boyd School of Law, UNLV, and Dean Emerita of the Michigan State University College of Law. She is the author of Shaping the Bar: The Future of Attorney Licensing (Stanford University Press 2023) and many articles on lawyer licensing. She has served as a member of the Nevada Board of Bar Examiners since 2020.

    Her other scholarship focuses on legal education; LGBT legal history; and capital punishment, especially as related to gender and sexuality. She is a leader in legal education through work with the Association of American Law Schools, the American Bar Association, the Collaboratory on Legal Education and Licensing for Practice, and the Society of American Law Teachers. Her courses include Performance Tests on Bar Exams & in Practice, Constitutional Law, Torts, Capital Defense Clinic, and Low-Income Tax Clinic. Prior to becoming a law professor she practiced law with the Office of the State Public Defender (California) and the ACLU Foundation of Southern California.

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    Deborah Jones Merritt

    Radical Reinvention of the First Year of Law School: What Subjects and Ideas Are Foundational?

    Professor Deborah Jones Merritt graduated from Harvard College summa cum laude in 1977 and from Columbia Law School in 1980. While at Columbia, she was managing editor of the Columbia Law Review and won the Robert Noxon Toppan Prize.

    After graduation, Professor Merritt clerked for Judge (then Justice) Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor on the Supreme Court of the United States.

    Professor Merritt practiced law in Atlanta and joined the law faculty at the University of Illinois in 1985. She served there as professor of law, professor of women’s studies, advisor to the Joint JD/MD Program, and associate dean for academic affairs before moving to Ohio State, where she accepted the Drinko Chair in 1995.

    Professor Merritt has published widely on issues of equality, affirmative action, federalism, health and technology, legal education, tort reform, and law and social science. Much of her work has focused on public policy issues, and she has made numerous presentations to judges, legislators, and other policymakers. In 2009, the United States Supreme Court invited her to defend the lower-court judgment in Reed Elsevier v. Muchnick, a prominent copyright class action. Professor Merritt also has co-taught courses in Europe with both Justice Ginsburg and Justice O’Connor.

Questions Regarding the Law Review Symposium?

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    Contact the Acting Symposium Director

    For questions regarding the Law Review Symposium, please contact Kevin Lynch, Editor-in-Chief at lynchke2@udmercy.edu.

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    Call For Proposals

    2024 University of Detroit Mercy Law Review Symposium
    Law School 101: An Exploration of Legal Pedagogy
    CALL FOR PROPOSALS
    Deadline: Friday, November 10, 2023

    Call for Proposals:

    The University of Detroit Mercy Law Review is currently accepting proposals for our annual symposium. In celebration of the 101st Volume of the Detroit Mercy Law Review, this year’s theme is Law School 101: An Exploration of Legal Pedagogy. The symposium will take place on Friday, March 8, 2024, in Detroit, Michigan.

    Legal pedagogy refers to the study and practice of teaching in law school. The practical side of teaching law—such as lesson planning, course design, and assessment methods—as well as the theoretical side, are both important aspects of legal pedagogy. Effective legal pedagogy seeks to equip students with the knowledge, skills, and ethical framework necessary to succeed in the modern legal field. This includes developing critical thinking and problem-solving abilities, as well as an appreciation for the importance of justice and fairness in the legal system.

    Detroit Mercy Law Review invites academics, scholars, practitioners, and other stakeholders to submit proposals for panel presentation and/or publication on topics involving legal pedagogy. Some potential topics may include, but are not limited to, the following: modernization, the Uniform Bar Examination, teaching methods, learning methods, courses, grading systems, assessments, in-class vs out-of-class learning, in-person vs remote learning, learning materials, clinical programs, externships, and the intersectionality of legal pedagogy and other topics such as: psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, the 1st Amendment, economics, ethics, equality, bias, race, class, gender, discrimination, or political ideologies.

    Submission Procedure:

    Proposals should be approximately 250-500 words, double-spaced, and should detail the proposed topic and presentation. Proposals must be submitted no later than 5:00 PM EST, Friday, November 10, 2023, by email to Samantha Talieri, Executive Articles Editor, at lawreview@udmercy.edu. In your email, please indicate whether your proposal is for a presentation only, or if you plan to submit an article based on your presentation for potential publication in the Detroit Mercy Law Review. Also, please include a current CV or resume. If you do not wish to present at the

    Symposium but would like to submit a relevant unpublished article for potential publication in the Detroit Mercy Law Review, please indicate that in your email as well. If your article is already complete, please attach a copy for review.

    Decisions will be emailed on or before December 15, 2023. The final completed manuscripts must be submitted by March 15, 2024, for editing to commence by the Law Review Staff.