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Law Review Symposium



2020 Detroit Mercy Law Review Symposium:
Race, Class, and Environmental Justice

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Please join us at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law 
on Friday, March 6th for the Law Review Symposium.

2020 Law Review Symposium: 
Race, Class, and Environmental Justice
Friday, March 6th, 2020
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. | Room 226

The Law Review will welcome scholars, legal professionals, and community leaders from across the country to discuss issues at the intersection of environmental law and environmental justice. Topics will include how effects from climate change, water quality, natural disasters, and food supply impact marginalized communities. The event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow in the Law School’s atrium. Please contact Bridget Underhill at underhbl@udmercy.edu with any questions. If you would like to register for this event, please visit our Eventbrite Page and click "Register".  

Please click the links below to find more information on this event:

Panels                    Agenda

 

Panels

Panel I. Water Justice & Lead Exposure

  • Nick Schroeck, Professor, Detroit Mercy Law 
  • Oday Salim, Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Michigan Law School 
  • Kristin Totten, Education Attorney, American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan
  • Karen Czapanskiy, Professor, University of Maryland Carey School of Law
Panel II. Natural Disasters & Climate Change
  • Cinnamon Carlarne, Alumni Society Designated Professor, Moritz College of Law at the Ohio State University 
  • Travis Brandon, Associate Professor, Belmont University College of Law 
  • Wyatt Sassman, Assistant Professor, University of Denver Sturm College of Law
Panel III. Food Justice & the Green New Deal 
  • Andrea Freeman, Associate Professor, University of Hawaii William S. Richardson School of Law 
  • Lauren Bartlett, Assistant Clinical Professor and Director of the New Human Rights at Home Litigation Clinic, St. Louis University School of Law
  • Sarah Matsumoto, Clinical Teaching Fellow, University of Denver Sturm College of Law 
Lunch Keynote Conversation
  • Monica Lewis-Patrick
Panel IV. Community Lawyering & Environmental Justice Organization 
  • Tai Steph, Professor, University of Wisconsin School of Law, Jayesh Patel, President and Managing Attorney, Street Democracy
  • Justin Onwenu, Local Organizer, Sierra Club 
  • Melissa Sargent, Local Organizer, Ecology Center 
  • Regina Strong, Environmental Justice Public Advocate, Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy 

Agenda

Panel 1 - Water Justice & Lead Exposure: 9:30 am - 10:45 am
Panel 2 - Natural Disasters & Climate Change: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Lunch - Keynote Discussion: 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Panel 3 - Food Justice & the Green New Deal: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Panel 4 - Community Lawyering & Environmental Justice Organizing: 3:15 pm - 4:15 pm
Reception - Following the Symposium, a cocktail reception will take place from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. in the Detroit Mercy Law Atrium. At the reception, local artists will display art created from recycled and environmentally friendly materials. Join for an evening of delicious drinks and hors d’oeuvres while connecting with the various panelists, students and community members.
*Guests are encouraged to bring reusable water bottles.

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    Annual McElroy Lecture

    HISTORY

    In February 1998, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law began the McElroy Lecture Series to address prominent issues of religion, law and society. The McElroy Lecture is sponsored by UDM Law through a bequest from alumnus Philip J. McElroy for the establishment of the Center of Law and Religion at UDM Law. The McElroy Lecture on Law and Religion provides a forum for prominent thinkers and leaders to address fundamental issues of law, religion and society.

    It seeks to educate students, legal professionals, and the wider public on a variety of questions related to moral philosophy, freedom of conscience, the interaction of legal and religious institutions, and the role of religion in public life. Its goal is to encourage discussion of these issues in our community and deepen our understanding of them.

    Prior lecturers have been U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, Stephen L. Carter, Adam Cardinal Maida, Hon. John T. Noonan, Jr., Michael John Perry, Jaroslav Pelikan, Dennis W. Archer, Geoffrey C. Hazard, Jr., Cass R. Sunstein, Noah Feldman, Leslie Griffin, Roger Cardinal Mahony, John Witte, Jr., Douglas M. Laycock, Marci A. Hamilton, and Sarah Barringer Gordon.

    These lectures have had a profound impact on the nation’s understanding of  law and religion. For example, Professor Laycock’s 2011 lecture was cited to in briefs submitted to the United States Supreme Court in Obergefell v. HodgesSebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., and Hollingsworth v. Perry.

    2019 LECTURE 

     

    This year's McElroy Lecture, “Why Buddhism and Law Has Been Excluded from the Canon,”  explored why the discipline of Buddhism and law has never been accepted in the West, despite the fact that the Buddha inspired a law code that has been called the founding charter of Buddhism.  Rebecca French, professor of Law at the University at Buffalo School of Law, part of the State University of New York system, discussed this phenomenon against the background of Buddhist history, early Christianity and the dominance of the Holy Roman Empire as a model of state and religious law. She explored the role of colonialism in excluding Buddhism and Law from the canon of comparative religious law.  

    Ms. French received her B.A. from the University of Michigan, her J.D. from the University of Washington, and an LL.M. and Ph.D. in legal anthropology from Yale University. Her scholarship is situated at the intersections of law, anthropology, legal theory, religious studies and Buddhist legal systems. She conducted four years of field research in Tibet and India that resulted in a study of the Dalai Lama’s pre-1960 legal system, titled “The Golden Yoke.” Her other publications include “Buddhism and Law: An Introduction” and the academic journal, “Buddhism, Law & Society.”

    2018 LECTURE

    Detroit Mercy School of Law hosted in 20th annual McElroy Lecture on March 28, 2018.  This year’s lecturer was University of Victoria Law School Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law John Borrows.  Mr. Barrows’ speech was titled “The Revitalization of Indigenous Spirituality:  Court and Community Conflicts.”

    Over the past few decades in Canada, there has been a resurgence of respect for and knowledge about Indigenous people (the first peoples of Canada).  Spirituality plays a key role in Indigenous legal traditions in Canada, rooted as they are in principles such as the Seven Grandmother teachings of love, truth, bravery, humility, wisdom, honesty, and respect. In the past, Indigenous legal traditions, much like Native American traditions in the United States, have been misunderstood as primitive, broken, disappearing, irrelevant, or even nonexistent.  That is changing in Canada.  Dr. Borrows discussed how Indigenous spirituality and legal traditions provide new resources for legal reasoning and thinking in areas such as child welfare, education, health, housing, and natural resource development.

    2017 LECTURE

    University of Detroit Mercy School of Law hosted its 19th McElroy Lecture on Law and Religion on Thursday, March 2, 2017.  This year’s lecturer was Intisar A. Rabb, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Director of its Islamic Legal Studies Program.  Rabb holds an appointment as a Professor of History at Harvard University and as the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. The title of her lecture is, “Qāḍī Justice: Islamic Law as Procedure.” 

    PUBLICATION OF PAST MCELROY LECTURES


    Since 1998, the University of Detroit Mercy Law Review has been honored to publish the lectures and essays that have come out of the event. Below is the publication information.

    2016 – Kent Greenawalt, Granting Exemptions from Legal Duties: When are They Warranted and What is the Place of Religion? 93 U. Det. Mercy. L. Rev. 89 (2016). 

    2012 – Marci A. Hamilton, Child Sex Abuse in Institutional Settings: What Is Next, 89 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 421 (2012).

    2011 – Douglas Laycock, Sex, Atheism, and the Free Exercise of Religion, 88 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 407 (2011). 

    2010 –  John Witte, Jr., Natural Rights, Popular Sovereignty, and Covenant Politics: Johannes Althusius and the Dutch Revolt and Republic, 87 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 565 (2010). 

    2009 – Cardinal Roger Mahony, Immigration, the Rule of Law, and the Common Good, 86 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 603 (2009).

    2008 – Leslie C. Griffin, No Law Respecting the Practice of Religion, 85 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 475 (2008). 

    2006 – Cass R. Sunstein, Celebrating God, Constitutionally, 83 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 567 (2006). 

    2007 – Noah Feldman, Law, Islam, and the Future of the Middle East, 84 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 617 (2007).

    2001 – Michael J. Perry, Religion, Politics, and Abortion, 79 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 1 (2001).

    2000 – Stephen L. Carter, Religious Freedom As If Family Matters, 78 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 1 (2000)

    2000 – Adam Cardinal Maida, The Voice of Religion in Shaping Culture and Law, 78 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 17 (2000). 

    2000 – Joseph P. Daoust, S.J., Legal Education in A Catholic University Mission and Possibilities, 78 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 27      (2000). 

    2000 – Chad Baruch, In the Name of the Father: A Critique of Reliance Upon Jewish Law to Support Capital Punishment in the United States, 78 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 41 (2000). 

    2000 – Marsha B. Freeman, Divorce Mediation: Sweeping Conflicts Under the Rug, Time to Clean House, 78 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 67 (2000). 
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    2019 Detroit Mercy Law Review Symposium: Women and the Law

    2019 Detroit Mercy Law Review Symposium:
    Women and the Law

    The Law Review at University of Detroit Mercy School of Law held its 103rd annual symposium: Women and the Law on Friday, March 8, 2019 (International Women's Day) in Detroit, Michigan.  This year's Symposium was dedicated to the ever changing role of women in the law.  The Symposium consisted of four panels covering education and legislation, the #MeToo movement, my body: the right to body integrity, and sexual exploitation, discrimination and the battle for equality.  A special thank you to our distinguished panelists.

    2019 Symposium Schedule

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    2018 Symposium: Return of Sanctuary Cities

    THE RETURN OF SANCTUARY CITIES:
    THE MUSLIM BAN, HURRICANE MARIA, AND
    EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN


     
     

    The University of Detroit Mercy Law Review held its annual academic Symposium on March 23, 2018, at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. The Symposium contemplated a broad range of issues associated with sanctuary cities–from past and present issues to potential future solutions.

    Symposium Schedule

    8:30 a.m.

    Registration

    9:15 a.m. Opening Remarks

    Phyllis L. Crocker
    Dean of University of Detroit Mercy School of Law
    9:30 a.m. An Introduction to Sanctuary Cities

    Andrew Moore

    Assoc. Professor of Law, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law
    10:00 a.m. Session 1: Sanctuary Cities, Federalism, and States’ Rights “Anti-Commandeering Resolutions” and Sanctuary Cities

    Ilaria Di Gioia
    American Constitutional Law Lecturer, Birmingham City University
    Honorary Vice-Consul for Italy, Birmingham, UKFugitive Slaves, Sanctuary Cities, and the Illusion of States’ Rights Conservatism

    Sandra L. Rierson
    Assoc. Professor of Law, Thomas Jefferson School of LawModerator: Prof. Cara Cunningham Warren, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law
    11:00 a.m.

    Session 2:

    Courts’ Influence on Immigration
    Denial of Citizenship on False Testimony Grounds

    Nermeen S. Aratsu
    Co-Director, Immigrant & Non-Citizen Rights Clinic
    Clinical Professor, City University of New York School of LawThe Constitutionality of Prolonged Detention of Non-Citizens in the Wake of Trump’s Executive Orders

    Elizabeth M. Knowles
    Supervisor, Immigration & Human Rights Law Clinic
    Professor of Law, University of Akron School of LawThe Plenary Power Doctrine and the Constitutional Avoidance Canon

    Ryan Azad
    Law Clerk, United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee
    Rule of Law and the Support of Activism

    Kerry E. Doyle
    Partner, Graves & Doyle

    Moderator: Prof. Alex Vernon, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

    12:00 p.m. LUNCH – in the Atrium
    1:00 p.m.

    Session 3: Who is a Citizen, Who is Permitted In, and Temporary Protected Status 
    The Democratic City: Citizenship, Democracy, and Urban Life in the Time of Globalization

    Kenneth Stahl
    Professor of Law, Chapman University Fowler School of LawTemporary Protected Status and Climate Change Refugees

    Glenys P. Spence
    Professor of Law, Arizona Summit Law SchoolSanctuary, Temporary Protected Status, and Catholic Social Teaching

    Kristina M. Campbell
    Co-Director, Immigration and Human Rights Clinic
    Professor of Law, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law

    Moderator: Prof.  Andrew Moore, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

    2:15 p.m. Closing Remarks

    Cara Cunningham Warren

    Assoc. Professor of Law, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law
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    2017 Symposium: The Impact of Formative Assessment

    The Impact of Formative Assessment:
    Emphasizing Outcome Measures in Legal Education


    The University of Detroit Mercy Law Review held its annual academic Symposium on March 3, 2017, at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. The Symposium contemplated how the American Bar Association’s emphasis on outcome measures in its revised Standards for Approval will affect law students’ educational experience.

    Watch the symposium here.

    Symposium Schedule

    7:30 a.m. Registration and Breakfast
    8:15 a.m. Opening Remarks

    Sandra L. Simpson
    Co-Director, The Institute for Law Teaching and Learning
    Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Gonzaga University School of Law
    8:30 a.m. Session 1:  In Theory, This Will Work: Cognitive Science and Learning Theory Bases for Formative Assessment

    Planning Your Class to Maximize Your Students’ Use of Highly Effective Learning Techniques
    James McGrath
    Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Academic Support and Bar Passage
    Texas A&M University School of Law

    Embodied Legal Education: Incorporating Another Part of Bloom’s Taxonomy
    Sue Liemer
    Professor of Law and Director of Lawyering Skills
    Southern Illinois University School of Law

    Contemporary Teaching Strategies: Effectively Engaging Millennials Through Formative Assessment
    Renee Nicole Allen
    Director of Academic Success Program
    University of Tennessee College of Law

    Alicia Jackson
    Associate Dean for Student Learning and Assessment
    Florida A&M University College of Law

    Moderator: Prof. Victoria VanZandt, University of Dayton Law School

    9:45 a.m. Session 2: Crunching the Numbers: Empirical Studies of Formative Assessment Trials


    Formative Assessments: A Case Study
    Ruth Colker
    Distinguished University Professor & Heck-Faust Memorial Chair in Constitutional Law
    The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

    Formative Peer Review: Promoting Interactive, Reflective Learning, or the Blind Leading the Blind?
    Dr. Andrew W. Noble
    Tutor in Law
    Coventry University College (United Kingdom)

    Should you bother reaching out? Performance Effects of Combining Early Direct Outreach to Low-Performing Students with Formative Assessment
    David Siegel
    Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Law and Social Responsibility
    New England Law

    Moderator: Prof. Sue Liemer, Southern Illinois University School of Law

    10:45 a.m. Session 3: Herding Cats: Coordination of Assessment and Standards (Part One)

    Suppose the Class Began the Day the Case Walked In the Door: Accepting Standard 314’s Invitation to Imagine a More Powerful, Professionally Authentic First-Year Learning Experience
    Jennifer Spreng
    Instructor in Law Success
    St. Mary’s University School of Law

    Avoiding Assessment Fatigue: Garnering the Lessons Learned from K-12, and thereby Helping Students Balance Numerous Types of Formative Assessments
    Sandra L. Simpson
    Co-Director, The Institute for Law Teaching and Learning
    Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Gonzaga University School of Law

    The ABA Assessment Mandates and Academic Freedom
    Victoria Van Zandt
    Coordinator of the Legal Professor Program
    Professor of Lawyering Skills
    University of Dayton School of Law

    Moderator: Prof. James McGrath, Texas A&M Law School 

    12:00 p.m. LUNCH – in the Atrium
    1:00 p.m.

    Session 4: Herding Cats: Coordination of Assessment and Standards (Part Two)

    The Rubric Meets the Road in Legal Education: Program Assessment of the Degree to Which a Law School’s J.D. Program is Achieve Its Learning Outcomes
    Benjamin V. Madison, III
    Professor of Law
    Co-Director, Center for Ethical Formation & Legal Education Reform
    Regent University School of Law

    Designing Assessments Around Learning Outcomes
    Joni Larson
    Professor of Law
    Indiana Tech Law School

    Linking Course Level and Institutional Assessment
    Docia L. Rudley
    Executive Director for Assessment
    Texas Southern University, Thurgood Marshall School of Law

    Moderator: Prof.  Ruth Colker, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

    2:15 p.m.

    Session 5: Did We Forget Anything? The Students!

    Creating Desirable Difficulties: Strategies for Reshaping Teaching and Learning in the Law School Classroom
    Elizabeth M. Bloom
    Professor of Law and Director of Academic Excellence Program
    New England Law

    Benefits of and Methods for Incorporating Formative Assessment into the Classroom
    Julie St. John
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Legal Writing and Research
    University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

    Unrealized Potential: How Shifting the Focus to Student Learning Outcomes Could Positively Impact Law Students’ Mental Health
    Elizabeth Usman
    Assistant Professor of Law
    Belmont University College of Law

    Abigail DeBlasis
    Assistant Professor of Law
    Belmont University College of Law

    “If You Give A Mouse A Cookie”: Increasing Assessment and Individualized Feedback in Law School Classes through Bar-Style Essay Questions
    Julia Belian and Karen McDonald Henning
    Associate Professors of Law
    University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

    Moderator: Prof. David Siegel, New England Law

    3:30 p.m. Closing Remarks

    Nadia Maraachli
    Editor-in-Chief, University of Detroit Mercy Law Review
  •  

    2016 Symposium: Centennial Symposium

    Centennial Symposium


    The University of Detroit Mercy Law Review celebrated its 100th anniversary with an academic symposium held on March 4, 2016 at Detroit Mercy Law in downtown Detroit. The Centennial Symposium showcased the past, present, and future of the City of Detroit, and gathered scholars, policy makers, and community members to discuss the past, present, and future of Detroit.
    We recorded the event for those who were unable to attend. You can watch Deputy Mayor McKinnon give his Opening Remarks; the first panel examine Detroit’s Past: Race, Riots, and Wars; an inside out view of Bankruptcy and the Grand Bargin, an exciting look at Detroit’s Future; and Judge Michael Riordan’s Closing Remarks.  

     

    Symposium Schedule

    8:00
    Coffee and Bagels
    8:30
    Welcome and Introductions
    9:00
    Opening Remarks
    • Isaiah McKinnon, Deputy Mayor City of Detroit
    9:30
    Detroit’s Past: Race, Riots, and Wars
    • Roy Finkenbine, Professor of History and Director of the Black Abolitionist Archive, University of Detroit Mercy
    • Tom Stanton, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, University of Detroit Mercy
    • Gregory Sumner, Professor of History, University of Detroit Mercy  
    11:00
    Detroit’s Present: Bankruptcy the Grand Bargain
    • The Honorable Gerald E. Rosen, Former Chief Judge of the US District Court for Eastern District of Michigan
    • Eugene A. Gargaro, (’67) Chair of the Board of Directors of the Detroit Institute of Arts
    • Brian Frye, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Kentucky College of Law
    12:30
    Lunch
    1:30
    Detroit Going Forward 
    • Shaakirrah Sanders, Associate Professor of Law, University of Idaho College of Law
    • Andrea Boyack, Associate Professor of Law, Washburn University School of Law
    • Timothy Dugdale, Founder of Atomic Quill Media
    3:00
    Closing Remarks
    • The Honorable Michael Riordan (’90), Michigan Court of Appeals
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    2015 Sympoisum: Great Lakes Symposium

    The Public Trust Doctrine:
    An Ancient Tool for Protecting the Great Lakes from New Hazards


    The 2015 Symposium titled, “The Public Trust Doctrine: An Ancient Tool for Protecting the Great Lakes from New Hazards,” was held on Friday, October 16, 2015, at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, 651 East Jefferson Avenue, Detroit, from 9:30 am – 3:15 pm.  Please view our Great Lakes Symposium Issue, Vol 93 Issue 2, to read more from our distinguished speakers. 

     

    SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

    Time Topic Speaker
    9:30 a.m. Welcome
    10:00 a.m. Introductory Remarks
    10:15 a.m. A Proper Framework for the Public Trust
    Doctrine and the Great Lakes

    Noah Hall 
    Associate Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Student Affairs
    Wayne State University Law School
    Detroit, MI

    James Huffman
    Dean Emeritus
    Lewis and Clark Law School
    Portland, OR

    Alexis Andiman
    Graduate Fellow Attorney
    The Conservation Law Center
    Bloomington, Indiana

    11:45 a.m. Lunch Grant Trigger
    1:00 p.m. Trails and Microplastics: New
    Developments

    Nicholas Schroeck
    Assistant Professor (Clinical) of Law
    Wayne State University Law School
    Detroit, MI

    Melissa Scanlan
    Associate Professor
    Vermont Law School
    South Royalton, VT


    Jim Olson

    2:15  p.m. Public Trust Doctrine Abroad

    Keynote Speaker

    Catherine Iorns Magallanes
    Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law,
    Victoria University of Wellington
    Wellington, New Zealand

    3:00 p.m. Closing Remarks
  •  

    2014 Symposium: Urban Agriculture in Distressed Cities

    Going to Seed: Urban Agriculture in Distressed Cities 


    The 2014 Symposium titled "Going to Seed: Urban Agriculture in Distressed Cities" was held on Friday, March 7, 2014, at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, 651 East Jefferson Avenue, Detroit, from 9:30 am – 2:45 pm.  Please view our Fall 2014 Symposium Issue, Vol 91 Issue 3, to read more from our distinguished speakers. 

    Participants

    Jaime Bouvier
    Senior Instructor in Law & Co-Director of the Academic and Writing Support Program
    Case Western Reserve University School of Law
    Cleveland, OH

    Daniel Carmody
    President of Eastern Market Corporation
    Detroit, MI

    Becky L. Jacobs
    Associate Professor
    University of Tennessee College of Law
    Knoxville, TN

    Dara Marcus
    Graduate Student in Public and International Affairs
    University of Ottawa
    Ottawa, Canada

    Jessica Owley
    Associate Professor
    SUNY Buffalo Law School
    Buffalo, NY

    Daniel Pitera
    Associate Professor of Architecture
    Director of Detroit Collaborative Design Center
    University of Detroit Mercy
    Detroit, MI

    Rebecca Purdom
    Assistant Dean of Environment Programs, Director of Distance Learning, and Associate Professor of Law
    Vermont Law School
    South Royalton, VT

    Anastasia Telesetsky
    Associate Professor
    University of Idaho College of Law
    Moscow, ID

    Peter T. Wendel
    Professor
    Pepperdine University School of Law
    Malibu, CA

    Becky Lundberg Witt
    Staff Attorney
    Community Law Center, Inc.
    Baltimore, MD

  •  

    2013 Symposium: Michigan Immigration and Economic Growth

    Global Michigan:  Immigration and Economic Growth


    The 2013 Symposium titled, “Global Michigan:  Immigration and Economic Growth,” was held on March 8, 2013, at the Detroit Athletic Club.

  •  

    2012 Symposium: The Future of Intellectual Property

    The Future of Intellectual Property

    The 2012 Symposium titled, “The Future of Intellectual Property,” was held on March 9, 2012 at the Detroit Athletic Club, and consisted of four panels covering the topics of: The Future of Patent Law, The Future of Trademark Law, The Future of Copyright, and The Future of International Intellectual Property Law.

    A special thank you to our distinguished panelists.

    The Future of Patent Law:

    Honorable Judge Avern Cohn
    United States District Court, Eastern District of Michigan

    Dr. Saby Ghoshray Ph. D.
    Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, President & Director
    World Compliance Co.

    Denise Glassmeyer
    Young Basile Hanlon & MacFarlane P.C.
    The Future of Trademark Law:

    Tim Gorbatoff
    Chief Intellectual Property Counsel
    General Motors

    Glynn S. Lunney, Jr.
    McGlinchey Stafford Professor of Law
    Tulane University Law School

    The Future of Copyright Law:

    Robert Brauneis
    Professor of Law; Co-Director of the Intellectual Property Law Program; Co-Director of the Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Studies; Member, Manging Board, Munich Intellectual Property Law Center
    George Washington University Law School

    Jessica Litman
    John F. Nickoll Professor of Law
    University of Michigan Law School

    Marybeth Peters
    Former United States Register of Copyrights

    The Future of International Intellectual Property Law:

    Myra J. Tawfik
    Professor of Law
    University of Windsor School of Law (Windsor Law)

    Peter K. Yu
    Director, Intellectual Property Law Center
    Kern Family Chair in Intellectual Property Law at Drake University Law School

    Michele J. Woods
    Associate Register for Policy and International Affairs
    United States Copyright Office

    Moderators:

    Michael P. Brennan
    Principal
    Harness, Dickey & Pierce

    Charlie Rutherford
    Law Offices of Charles R. Rutherford; Retired Shareholder
    Dykema Gossett, PLLC

    Howard B. Abrams
    Professor of Law
    University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

  •  

    2011 Symposium: 20 Year Review of Justice Clarence Thomas

    Celebrating an Anniversary: A Twenty-Year Review of Justice Clarence Thomas’ Jurisprudence and Contributions as an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court


    Our 2011 Symposium on the topic of “Celebrating an Anniversary: A Twenty-Year Review of Justice Clarence Thomas’ Jurisprudence and Contributions as an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court” was held on March 11, 2011.

    Thank you to our distinguished panel of speakers. 

    Moderators:

    Honorable Justice Brian Zahra
    Michigan Supreme Court

    Honorable Judge Christopher Murray
    Michigan Court of Appeals

    Keynote Speakers:

    John Eastman
    Dean at Chapman University School of Law, Donald P. Kennedy Chair in Law
    Former Clerk for Justice Thomas

    Panelists:

    Richard Albert
    Boston College
    J. Richard Broughton
    University Detroit Mercy School of Law
    Jonathan Entin
    Case Western Reserve University
    Scott Gerber
    Ohio Northern University
    Dean Lloyd Semple
    UDM School of Law
    Christopher Smith
    Michigan State University
    Ilya Somin
    George Mason University
    Shaun Springer
    University of Detroit Mercy School of Law graduate
    Lee Strang
    The University of Toledo
    Ralph Rossum
    Claremont McKenna College