UDM Law announces tuition freeze for 2015-16

UDM Law announces tuition freeze for 2015-16

  • UDM Board of Trustees approves tuition freeze for all current and incoming Law students
  • Press Release
  • Apply Now

HANDS-ON LEARNING FROM DAY ONE

HANDS-ON LEARNING FROM DAY ONE

  • * A legal writing program that starts in the first year and continues through the upper level courses.
  • * A clinical program that entitles every student to the opportunity to represent a live client.
  • * A unique law firm program that allows students to engage in simulated cases and transactions in specific practice areas.

DEDICATED TO SOCIAL JUSTICE

DEDICATED TO SOCIAL JUSTICE

  • * Committed to developing lawyers who serve the public good
  • * Committed to serving the Detroit community
  • * Founded on Jesuit and Mercy principles of service and the success of each individual

Study Internationally

Study Internationally

  • * Dual degree program with the University of Windsor
  • * Extensive international law and comparative law courses
  • * Established relationship with Universite d"Auvergne in Clermont-Ferrand, France

EXPAND YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

EXPAND YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

  • * Downtown Detroit Location provides proximity to courts and employers
  • * Strong Alumni Network dedicated to supporting UDM graduates
  • * ability to pursue a concentration in Immigration Law

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What's the big idea? UDMLaw Review Symposium looks at the future of IP law

By Steve Thorpe

Legal News

It seems that whatever international issue is raised today, China tends to step to the forefront.

"China is going to play a more assertive role in the international IP (intellectual property) regime," said Prof. Peter K. Yu. "If you are interested in international IP development, you want to ask questions about China."

The Law Review Symposium on the Future of Intellectual Property Law was hosted by the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law on March 9 at the Detroit Athletic Club. Four panels discussed the topics of The Future of Patent Law, The Future of Trademark Law, The Future of Copyright, and The Future of International Intellectual Property Law.

Panelists at the all-day event included U.S. District Judge Avern L. Cohn, Timothy Gorbatoff, Chief IP Counsel for General Motors, U-M Prof. Jessica Litman and Marybeth Peters, Former United States Register of Copyrights.

During the Future of International Copyright Law segment panelists talked about sweeping changes occurring in the realm of global intellectual property.

Disagreements on international intellectual property law in the past have often seen developed nations arrayed on one side of the argument and developing nations on the other. China is a particularly interesting case because it's in the process of crossing that fence. Currently a haven for "borrowed" IP and trademarks, it now is becoming interested in protecting those things.

"The traditional discussion about China is about piracy," Yu said. "But there are also some interesting developments in China on the trademark front."

Yu, founding director of the Intellectual Property Law Center at Drake University Law School, then showed a series of outrageous -- and sometimes amusing -- examples of ripoffs of trademarks in China.

"Here's a 'Blockberry,' not a Blackberry, and it's endorsed by President Obama. 'KFG Chicken' is popular as is 'O'McDonald's' with its famous three golden arches. 'Pizza Huh,' 'Buckstar Coffee' and Apple ... without the bite. Oddly, sometimes you actually get more features than the regular product, but much of the time it's just a low-quality replica."

But Yu said the Chinese appear to be serious about change.

"What's really interesting is that China is now actively building an intellectual property system, focusing on its own technological development," Yu said.

Although the focus in such discussions is often on protecting the rights of intellectual property holders like inventors, authors and composers, there is now a trend toward a more flexible approach.

"This idea that the sky will fall if rights holders can't have absolute control over the dissemination of copyrighted works really should be considered with skepticism," said panelist Wissam Aoun, an instructor at the University of Windsor Faculty of Law and an expert on patents, trademarks, scientific research and experimental development. "Social justice advocates have been speaking out -- including some of the people in this room -- about counter-hegemonic movements around the world. Another significant development in the evolution of international copyright law lies in its recent linkage with fundamental human rights instruments, such as Article 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights."

Michele Woods, Senior Counsel for Policy and International Affairs at United States Copyright Office, believes that the U.S. agency strikes the right balance between creators and users.

"Balance ... what does that mean? From the perspective of the U.S. Copyright Office, we reject the idea that balance is copyright vs. free copying of everything," she said. "That is not our idea of balance in the copyright system. We believe we have a strong and balanced copyright system of strong protections but also strong exceptions and limitations."

Woods cited frequent exceptions to copyright as demonstrating the flexibility already present in the current approach.

"For example, in the U.S. when we talk about access to copyrighted works for the blind and visually impaired, we have a copyright exception -- a very strong one -- to allow that access," she said.

Her office assists the Register of Copyrights in advising Congress and executive branch agencies on international copyright issues.

The panelists all agreed that the current "spaghetti bowl" of international trade agreements, treaties and laws will have to be simplified to accommodate the explosion of global trade. As always, the devil will be in the details as competing interests iron out their differences and settle on streamlined rules.

Published: Fri, Mar 16, 2012

EVENTS


April 1, 2015: Walk-in Wednesday - UDM Law Campus

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 2:00 pm

Join us for Walk-in Wednesdays. The Admissions Office extends its office hours for students who are interested in learning more about the UDM Law advantage, the application process, and law school in general. No appointment is necessary.


Application and Personal Statement Webinar - Online Webinar

Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 6:00 pm

Learn what the UDM Law Admissions Committee is looking for in an application for admission, including the personal statement.

Participants will receive a link to the webinar in their confirmation email.


June 18, 2015: Prospective Student Open House - UDM Law Campus

Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 5:00 pm

Find out why men and women have been choosing UDM Law for over 100 years for their legal education.  Learn how UDM Law not only teaches you the law, but teaches you how to be a lawyer.  Through your education here, you will become a lawyer who makes a difference in your workplace and your community.  

Attendees will have the opportunity to tour the campus and speak with admissions representatives, faculty, and current students.  

NEWS

  • UDM LAW PARTNERS WITH THE JESUIT REFUGEE SERVICE/USA TO ADDRESS CHALLENGES FACED BY CHILD MIGRANTS AND THEIR FAMILIES ENTERING THE U.S.

    Detroit Mercy Law has joined with many other Jesuit law schools to forge a partnership with the Jesuit Refugee Service/USA to address the challenges faced by child migrants and their families when they enter the United States.  Law school deans and Immigration Clinic professors met for the first time in January to collaborate on this initiative rooted in the Catholic tradition of welcoming the stranger.  Through this partnership, law students will help advance the legal, social, and cultural protection of migrants and others seeking refuge in the U.S.

    Press Release, Legal, Social, and Cultural Protection of Child Migrants, March 14, 2015

  • UDM LAW ALUMNUS SUZANNE WILHELM NAMED NEW DEAN OF COLLEGE OF SAINT ROSE HUETHER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS IN ALBANY

    UDM Law alumnus Suzanne Wilhelm has been named the new Dean of the College of Saint Rose Huether School of Business in Albany, New York, effective July 1, 2015.  Dr. Wilhelm comes to Saint Rose from Fort Lewis College in Colorado, where she has served as Associate Dean and Professor of Law in the School of Business Administration.  In her new capacity, Dr. Wilhelm will oversee the College's business programs leading to bachelor's degrees in business administration, accounting, economics, entrepreneurship, marketing, management and human resource management and master's degrees in business administration and accounting.

    College of Saint Rose Press Release

  • CHARITY DEAN (3L) AND JEFF MATIS ('94) SELECTED AS MICHIGAN POLITICAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM FELLOWS

    UDM Law 3L evening student Charity Dean and alumnus Jeffery Matis ('94) have been selected as Michigan Political Leadership Program Fellows.  The prestigious MPLP was founded in 1992 to expand training opportunities for people of all political backgrounds at every level of public service.

    Ms. Dean is currently the Community Relations Manager for the Detroit Land Bank Authority, and, among her many activities, she is Vice President of the Black Law Students Association.  Mr. Matis is an attorney with Garan Lucow Miller, PC, based in the Troy office.  He was a Councilman for the City of Rochester (November 2007 - January 2011), and he has served as Vice Chairman of the Oakland County Board of Commissioners since January 2011.

    Press Release - Michigan Political Leadership Program Welcomes Class of 2015

  • PROFESSOR LACOMBE COMMENTS ON IMMIGRATION REFORMS FOR HIGHLY-SKILLED FOREIGN WORKERS AND THEIR SPOUSES

    The Department of Homeland Security announced recently that it would allow 180,000 spouses of highly-skilled foreign employees to also apply for employment authorizations. After this year, it is estimated that approximately 55,000 spouses annually can do the same.

    According to UDM Law Adjunct Professor Alexandra LaCombe, "The next non-political step in immigration reform to benefit our nation is to quickly reduce the wait time for highly-skilled foreign workers who are employed here, but can’t get permanent residence for sometimes more than 10 years. . . .  Processing permanent status applications faster will make the U.S. more attractive to the workers we want and need to retain, rather than force them to keep eyes on other countries that may offer better options." 

    Professor LaCombe is a managing partner and attorney at Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen and Loewy in Troy and teaches Immigration Law in UDM's innovative Law Firm Program.

    Reducing wait time for STEM workers’ Green Cards is next step in immigration reform, March 4, 2015, Daily Tribune  (by UDM Law Adjunct Professor Alexandra LaCombe)

  • MI STATE BAR FOUNDATION GRANT PROVIDES FOR EXPANSION OF UDM LAW SOLO & SMALL FIRM INCUBATOR PROGRAM TO ADD SERVICES FOR SENIOR CITIZENS

    The Michigan State Bar Foundation has awarded University of Detroit Mercy School of Law a $10,000 grant to expand its Solo and Small Firm Incubator Program to include services to senior citizens in Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties.  The incubator program is designed to provide a supportive environment for select new law graduates who are committed to beginning a solo or small firm practice serving low and moderate-income individuals.  Through this expansion, the incubator attorneys will begin providing free services to seniors, including educating them on their legal rights, self-help assistance with legal matters, and appropriate referral sources.  The incubator program was established in October of 2014 with one of only seven catalyst grants awarded to law establishments across the country from the American Bar Association.

  • DUAL JD STUDENT CHRISTOPHER MACAULAY TAKES TOP HONORS IN NIAGARA INTERNATIONAL MOOT COURT COMPETITION

    Dual JD student Christopher Macaulay competed in the 2015 Niagara International Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C., as a member of the University of Windsor team.  The team placed first overall in the competition, Christopher won Fourth Best Advocate, and the team won awards for Best Team Applicant Argument Runner-Up and Best Team Applicant Memorial (tied for first place).  The problem dealt with immigration, human rights, and Great Lakes environmental law issues.